Olympic High School – Goodbye Old Buddy

Gladys Ly-Au Young
Categories: Uncategorized

Sometimes it is sad to see an old buddy go, especially a 40 year old buddy! Olympic High School was built in 1977 and it is undergoing a major remodel/addition. The high school consists of three units and the middle unit will be demolished in mid-July. Contractor is busy with abatement work. Teachers and movers are getting the last remaining items out of the middle portion. While we say our final goodbyes, let’s not forget a new buddy will be coming soon!

Olympic High School Groundbreaking!

Gladys Ly-Au Young
Categories: Uncategorized

Look at the anticipation and excitement from the students at Olympic High School! In the most dramatic way, the sun came out just before groundbreaking. Everyone not only has a smile on their face but also a sense of pride. They are proud that their high school is finally getting a renovation. SKL is super excited to be part of this project. The middle portion of the high school will be demolished and a new two-story building will add much needed new classrooms, CTE spaces, a central entry commons, auditorium, library and administrative offices. The expanded entry commons will be central to the transformation of the school. It will be transparent and welcoming, and offer a variety of learning environments. Go OHS!

Good journey to Gladys and Kaiea!

Myra Lara
Categories: Songea, Sundberg Architectural Initiative

Principal Gladys Ly-Au Young and her son, Kaiea, are on their way to Tanzania for construction of a vocational school. She and Kaiea will aid local teams learn new methods for building the school and residential buildings planned for Hope Village.

Before take off, both Ly-Au Young’s were able to fundraise and purchase educational and recreational supplies for the kids, including laptops, soccer balls, board games, sunscreen, vitamins and more!

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Pictures to follow hopefully soon!

Kingsgate Library Grand Re-opening this Saturday

Kingsgate_interior_blog

The renovated Kingsgate Library is celebrating its reopening on Saturday, April 30th, at 9:30am. The original KCLS library opened in 1973. We started design work for its renovation in 2013. Saturday will be the first day it is reopened to the public since its closure last year for construction.

Please join us in celebrating. The library is located at 12315 NE 143rd Street, Kirkland WA 98034.

Top Ten Reasons to Reuse an Existing Building – Karma

SKL
Categories: Adaptive Reuse, Theory & Practice

TOP TEN REASONS
TO REUSE AN EXISTING BUILDING


KARMA


 

adaptive-reuse-top-ten10

Keeping old buildings creates good Karma with neighbors and with the City. And, of course, with the ghosts of those that designed, built, and inhabited the place.

“Neighborhoods containing a mix of older, smaller buildings of diverse age support greater levels of positive economic and social activity than areas dominated by newer, larger buildings. These findings support the idea that retaining blocks of older, smaller, mixed-vintage buildings can help cities achieve sustainable development goals and foster great neighborhoods.” – “Older, Smaller, Better: Measuring How the Character of Buildings and Blocks Influences Urban Vitality” by Preservation Green Lab


Before and after: Imperial Laundry Building on Capitol Hill repurposed as the Seattle University School of Law Annex. No street setbacks were required, thus more floor area was allowed because the existing footprint was maintained.


TOP TEN REASONS
TO REUSE AN EXISTING BUILDING

History | Place | Character | Big | Material | Challenge | Energy | Cost | Karma | Vision

Top Ten Reasons to Reuse an Existing Building – Cost

SKL
Categories: Adaptive Reuse, Theory & Practice

TOP TEN REASONS
TO REUSE AN EXISTING BUILDING


COST


 

adaptive-reuse-top-ten9

There are costs and benefits to saving an old building, and they vary significantly by project. Costs can include seismic retrofits and the challenges of working around existing structures. Benefits include bonuses from the City (additional height, reduced parking requirements, etc.), reduced superstructure and finish costs and improved leaseability vs. new buildings.


The Frye Art Museum, before and after, renovated and expanded at $156 per sf in 1997.

Even with required seismic and sprinkler upgrades, the cost was significantly less than other new museums built at the time because the basic infrastructure was still in good shape.


TOP TEN REASONS
TO REUSE AN EXISTING BUILDING

History | Place | Character | Big | Material | Challenge | Energy | Cost | Karma | Vision

Top Ten Reasons to Reuse an Existing Building – Energy

SKL
Categories: Adaptive Reuse, Theory & Practice

TOP TEN REASONS
TO REUSE AN EXISTING BUILDING


ENERGY


adaptive-reuse-top-ten8

UW professor Kathryn Merlino describes old buildings as “valuable repositories of embodied energy and material value that shouldn’t be discounted”.

Embodied energy represents all the work that went into making the building, and is surprisingly large. For instance, an average 50,000 SF building in Washington State embodies about 80 billion BTU’s, the equivalent of 640,000 gallons of gas.

According to the Preservation Green Lab’s “The Greenest Building: Quantifying the Value of Building Reuse”, it can take decades for a more energy efficient new building to offset its own embodied energy, especially in a temperate climate like Seattle.

Another reason for adaptive re-use? 25% of Seattle’s landfill waste comes from construction and demolition.


“Although explosives got credit for erasing the obsolete sports arena, it was the relentless tug of gravity that actually did most of the work…” – Scott Loizeaux, President of Controlled Demolition, Inc.


TOP TEN REASONS
TO REUSE AN EXISTING BUILDING

History | Place | Character | Big | Material | Challenge | Energy | Cost | Karma | Vision

2016 Housing and Homelessness Advocacy Day

Gladys Ly-Au Young
Categories: Current Events

I went with Myra from our office to Olympia for Housing and Homelessness Advocacy Day on Tuesday, February 2. This is an annual advocacy event organized by Washington Low Income Housing Alliance. Capitol Hill Housing kindly gave us a ride in their van-pool from Seattle to Olympia. The event was very well organized and I definitely learned a lot. If I have to capture three important things I learned, they are: first, it is important to home the homeless where they are familiar. Stages of re-stabilization after being homeless can take 2 years or longer as many have mental health issues. This means, moving them around frequently might not be a good solution. Second, shelter and food are primal needs. Once you have stable housing the other issues can be solved. Housing means the formally homeless can be found and makes it easier to follow up with social and health services. Third, LIHI has been doing some tiny house villages for the homeless. These tiny homes were built with volunteer labor. From LIHI.org website, it said the materials for a tiny house cost $2,200! Volunteer build day is a great way to get support for these villages. There are many more things I learned about bills and the many efforts people are doing for homelessness but I am only highlighting three for now. Lastly, I heard a great answer to a question someone asked about “homeless refugees”. The term “refugees” used in this context does more to divide than to fix the problem. Our energy is better used to solve the problem than to pick and choose who we want to help.